Two Complete Menus For Turkey With White And Red Wine

Two Complete Menus For Turkey With White And Red Wine
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I’ve given you two completely different menus with flavors that will match best with a selection of white and red wines. The recipes are first, just keep scrolling down, the wine list follows each separate menu. The wines are also in the wine menu and have a “turkey” note next to them. I hope you enjoy.

 

 

You’ll Need:

 

 

To keep scrolling down to see my Thanksgiving holiday special menus for turkey with white wine and turkey with red wine.

 

 

 

 

The White Wine Turkey Menu

The glaze gives this turkey a beautiful rich color and a nice flavor that matches well with white wines. Try to use the fresh herbs if possible but dried will work, I’d suggest a tablespoon of dried for each herb.

Apricot-Glazed Turkey with Fresh Herb Gravy – Serves 12

Turkey:
16-pound turkey, (Woody’s note) fresh is preferred and you may want a bigger turkey for leftovers but the smaller size will cook faster.
1 tablespoon canola oil
Kosher salt and freshly ground pepper
1 lemon, halved
6 garlic cloves, crushed
6 large thyme springs
4 large rosemary sprigs
4 large sage sprigs
1 fresh bay leaf

Glaze:
3/4 cup apricot jam
1 1/2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
2 teaspoons grated lemon zest
1 1/2 tablespoons finely chopped sage
Kosher salt and freshly ground pepper

Gravy:
3 cups turkey or chicken stock
4 tablespoons unsalted butter
1/4 cup all-purpose flour
2 tablespoons chopped parsley
1 tablespoon finely chopped sage
1 teaspoon chopped thyme
Kosher salt and freshly ground pepper

Preheat the oven to 350°. Remove the turkey from the refrigerator at least 30 minutes before roasting. Pat the turkey dry and set it on a V-shaped rack in a large roasting pan. Rub the turkey all over with the oil and season it inside and out with salt and pepper. Stuff the cavity with the lemon halves, crushed garlic, thyme, rosemary, sage and bay leaf.

Roast the turkey for about 2 hours so that it begins to develop a golden color and an instant-read thermometer inserted between the leg and thigh registers about 150°.
Meanwhile, make the glaze: In a small bowl, mix the apricot jam, lemon juice, lemon zest and sage and season with salt and pepper. Microwave the glaze until thinned slightly, about 20 seconds.

Remove the turkey from the oven and brush with half of the glaze, roast for about 15 minutes more until the skin is mahogany-colored, then brush the turkey with the remaining glaze and roast for another 15 minutes or until the skin is deep mahogany and an instant-read thermometer inserted between the leg and thigh registers 165°. (Woody’s note) 165 is the old 185.

Tilt the turkey to drain all the juices from the cavity into the roasting pan. Transfer the turkey to a carving board cover with foil and a kitchen towel and let rest for 45 minutes.

Make the gravy: Skim the fat from the drippings in the roasting pan. Set the roasting pan over high heat and bring to a boil. Add the turkey/chicken stock and cook for 2 minutes, scraping up the browned bits from the bottom of the pan.
In a medium saucepan, melt the butter. Add the flour and cook over moderate heat until smooth, about 2 minutes. Strain 3 1/2 cups of the liquid in the roasting pan into the saucepan and whisk to blend. Bring the gravy to a simmer and cook over moderately low heat, whisking occasionally, until slightly thickened, about 5 minutes. Stir in the parsley, sage and thyme and season with salt and pepper. Pour the gravy into a small pitcher. Carve and serve with the gravy.

Focaccia bread stuffing with fennel and red onion

This is just like your standard Thanksgiving stuffing with onions and celery except we are going a bit Italian here using Focaccia bread, fennel and red onion. As the stuffing bakes, the center becomes creamy and soft while the edges and top turn crisp and chewy.
12 servings
Here’s what you’ll need:

2 pounds plain or onion Focaccia, cut into 1-inch dice (16 cups)
4 tablespoons unsalted butter
2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
3 medium fennel (anise) bulbs—halved lengthwise, cored and sliced lengthwise 1/4 inch thick
2 red onions, halved and sliced lengthwise 1/4 inch thick
3 garlic cloves, very finely chopped
1 1/2 teaspoons chopped thyme
1 teaspoon fennel seeds
3 1/2 cups chicken stock
Kosher salt and freshly ground pepper

Here’s what to do:

Preheat the oven to 375°. Spread the Focaccia on a large rimmed baking sheet. Toast for about 30 minutes, stirring halfway through, until dry and golden around the edges, do not burn. Transfer to a large bowl.
In a large skillet, melt 2 tablespoons of the butter in the olive oil. Add the fennel and onions and cook over moderate heat, stirring occasionally, until very tender, about 15 minutes. Add the garlic, thyme and fennel seeds and cook until fragrant, about 1 minute. Scrape the fennel mixture into the bowl with the Focaccia. Add the stock and toss until the bread is evenly moistened, then season with salt and pepper.

Increase the oven temperature to 400°. Butter a 9-by-13-inch baking dish with 1 tablespoon of the butter. Scrape the stuffing into the baking dish and dot the top with the remaining 1 tablespoon of butter. Cover with foil. Bake for about 20 minutes, until heated through. Remove the foil and bake for about 20 minutes longer, until the top is golden and crisp. Serve hot.

The assembled stuffing can be refrigerated overnight. Bring to room temperature before baking.

Mashed Potatoes with Crème Fraiche and Chives

12 servings

Here’s what you’ll need:

6 pounds Yukon Gold potatoes, peeled and halved
2 cups whole milk
1 1/2 sticks unsalted butter
Kosher salt

1/2 cup finely chopped chives
Freshly ground pepper
1 cup crème fraiche

Woody’s note with the help of Julia Child:
To make 1 cup of crème fraiche whisk ½ cup of chilled heavy cream and ½ cup of chilled sour cream in a bowl until lightly thickened. I suggest letting it sit out at room temperature for several hours to further thicken and sour a bit.

Here’s what to do:

In a large pot, cover the potatoes with cold water and bring to a boil. Cover and cook over moderate heat until the potatoes are tender, about 20 minutes; drain. Press the potatoes through a ricer or mash by had into a large saucepan set over low heat.

Meanwhile, in a small saucepan, combine the milk with 10 tablespoons of the butter and 1 tablespoon of salt and cook over moderate heat until the butter is melted, about 3 minutes.

Pour the hot milk over the mashed potatoes and cook over moderate heat, stirring occasionally, until blended, about 2 minutes. Stir in the crème fraiche, the remaining 2 tablespoons of butter and the chives and cook until the potatoes are heated through, about 5 minutes. Season with salt and pepper, transfer the mashed potatoes to a bowl and serve.

MAKE AHEAD
The mashed potatoes can be kept covered at room temperature for up to 3 hours. Reheat before serving.
Roasted Carrot and Cumin Puree

Carrots become sweet as they are roasted and that provides a perfect foil for the tartness of the lemon and the depth that cumin adds.

Here’s what you’ll need:

4 pounds carrots (about 20 large), cut into 1/2-inch slices
4 tablespoons olive oil
3 teaspoons or to taste of ground cumin
Salt
1/2 teaspoon fresh-ground black pepper
3tablespoon butter
2 ½ cups whole milk
1 teaspoon lemon juice

Here’s what to do:

Heat the oven to 450°. In a roasting pan, combine the carrots with the oil, cumin, ½ teaspoon salt, and the pepper. Roast the carrots, stirring occasionally, until tender and browned, about 20 minutes.
In a food processor, puree the carrots with the butter, milk (add half and then only add what is needed to bring to a creamy consistency, lemon juice, and 1/8 teaspoon salt and more to taste. If necessary, reheat the puree in a small saucepan over low heat, stirring.

Cranberry-Pomegranate Sauce

Pomegranate juice adds sweet-tart freshness to the cranberries while the pomegranate seeds offer a great pop in the mouth.

What you’ll need:

1 1/2 pounds fresh or frozen cranberries (6 cups)
2 cups sugar
1 cup pomegranate juice
2 cups fresh pomegranate seeds

Here’s what to do:

In a medium saucepan, combine the cranberries with the sugar and pomegranate juice. Bring to a simmer and cook over moderate heat, stirring occasionally, until most of the cranberries have burst, about 10 minutes. Scrape the cranberry sauce into a medium bowl and let stand until cool, about 2 hours. Fold in the pomegranate seeds and serve the sauce chilled or at room temperature.

MAKE AHEAD
The cranberry sauce can be refrigerated for up to 2 weeks. Fold in the pomegranate seeds just before serving.

 

Turkey Wine Whites
Scharffenberger Brut NV Mendocino County

www.scharffenbergercellars.com/

This Anderson Valley (Mendocino) bubbly is made from 65% Pinot Noir and 35% Chardonnay. The wine has complexity and richness. Good with most anything Thanksgiving but would tend more to the white side. R89 $13.99
Schramsberg “Mirabelle” Brut Rosé NV

www.schramsberg.com/

Sparkling rose is just about the perfect all-purpose Thanksgiving wine. This is a red side wine that will stand up to the smoke and richness of my meat stuffing and Weber turkey with floral aromas of strawberry and spicy yeast with raspberry, apple, ginger and fig flavors. This wine will also lay down so get a couple of extra bottles for next year. R93 $19.99
Banfi Rosa Regale Brachetto ’07 Piedmont, Italy
www.castellobanfi.com

Rosa Regale is a unique red sparkling wine. Aromatic with a hint of rose petals and raspberries, it could be delightfully across a palette of occasions and food pairings, from savory to sweet but I would think shows best against a dark glazed ham or chocolate desert or fruits like strawberries, raspberries, blueberries. $21.00

Hayman & Hill Interchange ’06 Santa Barbara
www.cdwine.com/ourwineries/haymanhill.htm

A blend of 47% Chardonnay, 34% Sauvignon Blanc, 7% Muscat, 5% Malvasia Bianca, 4% Semillon and 3% Gewurztraminer that will more than cover the white side of turkey. It has just the right amount of aromatic grape varieties to go with the healthy doses of Chardonnay and Sauvignon Blanc. R88 $9.79

Willow Crest Riesling ’07 Washington

A simple, dry Riesling with white flowers, pineapple and tangerine aromas in the nose. The dry fruit flavors cover the palate and it finishes up with a long-lasting lemony flavor. R88 $9.99

Chateau Ste. Michelle “Eroica” Riesling ‘07

www.ste-michelle.com
Slightly sweet but balanced by fine fruity acids, it smells of honeysuckle, white peaches and minerals. A top-notch Riesling with complexity that will age.” R93 $19.99.

Foxglove Central Coast Chardonnay ‘07
www.varnerwine.com/

A great value in the marketplace today, this is the second label of Varner winery that sources this fruit from the Edna Valley. The cuvee provides notes of tropical fruit and poached pear in a medium bodied style with minerality and precision. R90 $11.99

Chateau Ste. Michelle “Indian Wells” Columbia Valley ‘06
www.ste-michelle.com

This is a big wine with heady scents of caramelized apples and vanillin. The oak aromas on the palate, are brightened by juicy pear flavors and a nice balance of oak and fruit. R90 Best Buy $13.99

Sebastiani Russian River Unoaked Chardonnay ‘07
www.sebastiani.com/

This Chardonnay shows plenty of richness and creaminess from the particular yeast strain, I’m told, rather than oak aging. It has true Chardonnay flavor of citrus and apricot with the richness without the woodsy flavors. R90 $14.99

Del Rio Rogue Valley ‘07, Oregon
www.delriovineyards.com/

The Del Rio is a juicy mouthful of Chardonnay that is loaded with character. A blend of 97% Chardonnay with 3% Viognier to liven things up. It has aromas of citrus, apple, toast and vanilla. The palate is round and creamy with flavors of apple, orange and tropical fruits. The finish is crisp and dry. R90 $15.99

Chateau St. Jean “Robert Young Vineyard” Alexander Valley ‘06

www.chateaustjean.com
A lovely chardonnay with floral, tangerine, nectarine and green pear aromas. It’s full-bodied with lots of lively flavors, a long, clean finish that picks up a nice vanilla and honeysuckle note. R92 $21.99

The Red Wine Turkey Menu

Turkey Roasted on the Grill
12 servings with leftovers

You’ll need:

18-20 lb. turkey, I suggest using fresh if possible
1 Large onion cut into medium size pieces
4-5 celery stalks cut into one inch pieces
2 carrots cut into one inch pieces
4 cups chicken or turkey stock
Poultry seasoning
Dried sage
Salt and pepper
4 Tlbs butter, optional
Olive oil

Here’s what to do:

Start your grill and setup for indirect cooking (coals or heat on two sides) If you are using wood chips soak them for at least an hour before placing on fire.

Have someone hold the bird on end so you can pour a little olive oil, some salt and pepper, sage/poultry seasoning, maybe a couple of Tlbs. of butter and the cut up veggies into the cavity, then crumple a piece of tinfoil into a ball that will pretty much stop up the opening. Now you have a little flavor maker working inside the bird that will help gravy later.

Place the bird in a heavy duty aluminum half size (under 15 lbs. or so) or full size roasting pan, you may want to tie or pin the legs if the pan does hold them in. Pour some olive oil over the bird and rub it around with your hand. Then use salt, pepper, sage/poultry seasoning to sprinkle over the bird. If you care, gently force some butter under the turkey skin over the breast.

If you are using a remote thermometer place the probe into the turkey between the breast and the thigh and set the receiver for 155 degrees. Place the bird on the grill and add two cups of stock to the pan not over the bird. Add the wood chips to the coals and close the grill lid. Don’t forget the stock and get your lid on. Check the temperature of the grill once and hour and add coals as needed to keep the temperature at or about 325 degrees. Add more stock if the roasting pan is dry.

The bird’s going to take anywhere from 2 ½ to 3 ½ hours to cook depending on the weather, your charcoal, the size of the turkey and so forth. Use an instant read thermometer to check the temp after about 2 ½ hours, your looking for 155 degrees.

When the turkey reaches the desired temperature carefully remove it from the foil pan another rimed pan to hold the juices , cover with foil and a dish towel and let is rest for an least 30 minutes while you make the gravy. The temperature will heat forward to 165 or so, still good and the juices will settle nicely back into the meat. Pour the pan juices into a, two cup glass measuring cup and allow them to settle. You should have some nice stock/juice in the roasting pan and you want to pour or spoon-off as much as possible, strain to remove burned bits and solids, add them to the measuring cup. Once they’ve had a chance to settle you can spoon off most of the fat and then proceed to my gravy recipe. Gosh I’m hungry!

 

Italian Bread Dressing with Bacon-Sausage-Sage
Preparation time: 60 minutes — Yield: About 12-20 servings

You’ll need:

2 lbs. Italian style white bread, sliced and cubed
See Woody’s Way
4 – 6 c. chicken or turkey stock
See Woody’s Way
1 lbs each: sliced bacon, (smoked preferred) bulk pork sausage
See Woody’s Way

1/4 c. rubbed sage
1 large onions, diced 2 1/2 Tbs. poultry seasoning
1 head of celery, sliced 1 tsp. freshly ground pepper
1 lb. mushrooms, chopped 1/2 tsp. salt
1 stick unsalted butter

Here’s what to do:

1. Cut the bread – You can tear it if you want but cutting is more efficient. Depending on the size of the slices, stack two or three at a time and cut into uniform cubes tossing into a large bowl or onto a cookie sheets. You can let the bread sit overnight to begin drying out our immediately proceed to the next step. Preheat your oven to 400 degrees. Spread the cubes on to two cookie sheets so they are in one layer, bake for about 15 minutes, CHECK OFTEN TO PREVENT BURING, stirring when they start to brown to get a uniform light toasting, remove immediately and return to bowl. Set aside.

2. Dice the bacon before cooking; it’s easier to get a uniform cut. Break up the sausage once you get it into the pan. Use a large, deep skillet or heavy bottomed pot to cook the bacon and sausage over medium heat until they are thoroughly browned, 15 to 20 minutes. You may want to use two skillets or pots. You may want to drain fat after meats begin to cook depending on how much there is but reserve it for you may want to add some back to the vegetables for flavor.

Melt half the stick of butter in another frying pan over medium-high heat, add the onions and celery and allow them to cook down for maybe 10 minutes or until they become translucent then add sliced mushrooms and sauté the vegetable mixture for about 10 minutes until it begins to incorporate. Add the meats (and maybe some of the reserved fat) and cook together until heated. When fully cooked, transfer mixture to a large bowl. Do not wash skillet.

3. De-glaze the pan with 1 cup broth, heat to a simmer, scraping up any browned bits, mix with cooked meats and vegetables, cool slightly.

4. Add the meat and vegetable mixture, sage and poultry seasoning to the bread. Pour 2 cups of the broth mixture over the bread and toss lightly, taste and add salt and pepper to taste. Gradually add broth, less is more and toss to mix, you want damp but not soaked bread, taste and adjust seasoning as you like.

5. The dressing can be made a day ahead, covered tightly and refrigerated overnight. I don’t like stuffing turkeys, it affects there cooking time and adds to the work load, but if you are going to stuff, do not stuff and then store the turkey ahead of time.

6. To cook, preheat the oven to 375. Using the other half stick, butter a baking dish (foil pans work well) and fill with dressing, cover with foil and bake for 30 min. until steamy, remove foil and bake for another 10 minutes or until top is browned and crispy, remove from oven and cover or transfer to your grandmothers china bowl.

Woody’s Way

I use an Italian bread because it is denser and holds the liquid better, most plain white bread will fall apart, any bread that has a bit of a tooth to it will do.

I will assume that you are making my “Fool Proof Gravy” so that’s where you should get your stock from, make sure you have a few extra cups, you may need it depending on just how much and what style bread you use.

Spend a moment to find some good smoked bacon especially if you are cooking your turkey in a Weber style grill; it will help meld the flavors. Please try to find a fresh made, breakfast style, pork sausage; a butcher shop should have it and so do some supermarkets. The pre-made items (Jimmy Dean’s for example) are full of salt and preservatives and are not suitable for this dish.

 

 
Grill-Roasted Vegetables with Pine Nut Pesto

Keep the grill going so you can do the veggies. Brussels sprouts, parsnips, butternut squash and carrots—get grilled, then tossed in a cheesy pine nut pesto.

12 servings

You’ll need:

1 pound carrots cut into 1-inch pieces
1 pound parsnips cut into 1-inch pieces
1 pound brussels sprouts, halved lengthwise
One 2 1/2-pound butternut squash—peeled, seeded and cut into 1/2-by-1 1/2-inch pieces
2 large shallots cut into 1/2-inch wedges
6 thyme sprigs
1/2 cup extra-virgin olive oil
Salt and freshly ground pepper
1/4 cup plus 2 tablespoons pine nuts
1 tablespoon unsalted butter
1 large garlic clove, thinly sliced
1/4 cup freshly grated Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese

Here’s what to do:

In a large bowl, toss the carrots and parsnip pieces with the brussels sprouts, butternut squash, shallots, thyme sprigs and 1/4 cup of the olive oil. Season generously with salt and pepper.

Grill should be ready for high heat (about 425°). Place 2 perforated grill pans or sheets of foil with small holes punched in them, directly on the grate to heat for about 10 minutes. Divide the vegetables between the grill pans and grill over high heat, stirring and turning occasionally, until they are tender and lightly charred in spots, about 50 minutes. Alternatively, roast the vegetables in a large roasting pan in a 425° oven, stirring them occasionally.

Meanwhile, in a small skillet, heat 1 tablespoon of the olive oil. Add the pine nuts and cook over low heat, stirring constantly, until they are lightly browned, about 2 minutes. Add the butter and garlic and cook, stirring, until the pine nuts are browned and the garlic is golden, about 2 minutes. Let cool, then transfer to a mini processor. Add the grated cheese and the remaining 3 tablespoons of olive oil and pulse to a chunky puree. Season the pine nut pesto with salt.
Transfer the vegetables to a large bowl and toss with the pine nut pesto. Serve hot or warm.

MAKE AHEAD
The pine nut pesto can be refrigerated overnight. Bring to room temperature before proceeding.

 
Cranberry Sauce
Makes 2 1/2 cups

1 c. water
3/4 c. sugar
1/4 c. orange marmalade
12 oz. (1 pkg.) fresh or frozen cranberries

Combine water and sugar in a saucepan. Boil and stir until the sugar dissolves, then add the marmalade and cranberries. Boil gently until the cranberries soften and begin to pop. Serve hot or cold.

 

Foolproof Turkey Pan Drippings Gravy
Makes about 6 to 7 cups

You’ll need:

Turkey neck and giblets from whole turkey
See Woody’s Way
6 c. chicken broth or chicken flavored soup base.
See Woody’s Way
2 large onions, peeled, quartered
1 c. sliced carrots
1 c. celery leaves
1 c. dry white wine or water
6Tlbs. all-purpose flour
6 Tbs. butter, at room temperature
Turkey pan drippings
Salt and pepper to taste

Here’s what to do:

1. Up to 3 days ahead cut turkey neck and heart in half and place in saucepan with gizzard, chicken broth, onions, carrots, wine and celery leaves. Bring to a boil, reduce heat and simmer gently, uncovered, 1 1/2 hours. Add liver and simmer 30 minutes longer or until gizzard is very tender.

2. Remove giblets to a cutting board and strain broth into a large sauce pan or bowl, pressing vegetables to extract as much broth as possible. Discard vegetables. Add water to broth if needed to make 6 cups.

3. Chop giblets and neck meat. Refrigerate in covered container.

4. Mash butter and flour with your fingers until blended to a paste. Divide into four portions.

5. Bring broth to a boil, reduce heat to low and gradually whisk in flour mixture, one portion at a time, until blended, whisk until thickened and boiling. Boil 3 minutes longer to cook out any “floury” taste.

6. Cover surface of gravy with waxed paper or plastic wrap to keep a skin from forming. Refrigerate.

7. After you remove the turkey and wrap it in foil to rest for at least 30 minutes. Pour remaining liquid into large glass measuring cup or pitcher. Allow it to settle, fat will separate to the top, then pour or spoon off fat and discard. Take up to two cups of water or stock and stir into pan juices, scraping up brown bits on bottom of pan. You may even want to heat the roasting pan on your cook top to help deglaze the bits further. Stir in giblets and neck meat and heat over medium-low heat until hot and cook for five minutes to meld. Strain to remove all meat and vegetable pieces.

Tasting as you go, now add back the pan dripping mixture into the gravy a half cup at a time until you are happy with the flavor, the gravy will darken due to the color of the drippings. Add pepper first and then salt to taste, if you thin too far added another tablespoon of butter and flour.

Woody’s way – To add even more flavor to the stock, melt a couple of table spoons of butter in a medium sauté pan and brown the turkey parts over medium-high heat for several minutes before adding to the stock, don’t burn the butter. Deglaze the pan with a little white wine or stock to get all flavor bits. If you are cooking a whole or partial turkey breast you won’t have the organ parts (they only come with whole birds) so look for packages of turkey necks or use chicken livers and thighs in place of them to add flavor.

If you are making a bread stuffing make a total of 20-24 cups of stock. Increase the vegetables used to three onions, two cups of carrots, 2 cups of celery leaves and two cups of wine.

I use a commercial soup base (powdered) when I make a volume of chicken or beef stock, be careful when you select a brand that it doesn’t have too much salt and be careful to taste before adding any additional salt. Some markets do carry ready made stocks in quarts.
Turkey Red Wines

Chandon Blanc de Noir, NV Yountville
www.chandon.com

This is my goes with everything Thanksgiving wine, nice salmon color with dark cherry, currant and strawberry fruit in the palate. There’s a bit of cassis and blackberry in the flavor and it finishes with a soft creamy texture. R89 $21.00

Deloach Pinot Noir 2007, California
www.deloachvineyards.com

Not many PN’s out there in the reasonable price range these days that any good but this wine will get you started. It’s softly spiced with cherry flavors that are smooth and lengthy. It is clean, it is not hot, and it is not candied. Good value R87 $10.99

A to Z Pinot Noir ’07, Oregon
www.northwest-wine.com/

The A to Z Pinot Noir is a sure hit. It has soft and juicy flavors of black cherry and black raspberry with some barely noticeable oak. Very ripe in the mouth with a finish of black pepper and tart black raspberry. R88 $16.79

Robert Mondavi Carneros Pinot Noir ‘06
www.robertmondaviwinery.com

Sweet and ripe berries with cherry, raspberry and strawberry are all apparent on the palate along with some black pepper and oak flavors, make this wine very smooth and very soft. R90 $19.99

Castlerock Zinfandel ’06 Mendocino
www.castlerockwinery.com

As usual CR hits just outside the prime zone but close enough to be a winner. Big red fruit aromas with nice Zin style but not too big or tannic. You wished you’d get this as a “house wine” pour for $6 and may be best for that at your house. R89 $10.99

Sobon Estate “Rocky Top” ‘06 Zinfandel Amador
www.sobonwine.com

Rocky Top is just that, a vineyard with soils of volcanic ash and boulders, and produces old vine Zinfandel of immense proportions. The aromas are very floral, with vanilla and raspberry jam forward and inviting. The flavors match the aromas, with a rich juicy component. The finish is long and velvety-rich. R89 $14.99

Easton Zinfandel ‘07 Amador County
www.terrerougewines.com
Here is another house Zin done in a “claret-styled” Zinfandel. It’s loaded with pepper and spice and ripe, soft fruit flavors. Nice balance of fruit and alcohol in the finish. R89 $13.99

Ridge “Three Valleys” Zinfandel ‘06 Sonoma County
www.ridgewine.com
Ridge is a BIG zin producer but this wine within better reason and while it will age for a couple of years it tastes rather well now. Fresh black cherry flavors lead to a cool, forestry feel to balance the tannins and spice. R90 $19.99

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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What Goes With What Wines Selections

A to Z Pinot Noir ’07, Oregon – Turkey Red (Pinot_Noir)
The A to Z Pinot Noir is a sure hit. It has soft and juicy flavors of black cherry and black raspberry with some barely noticeable oak. Very ripe in the mouth with a finish of black pepper and tart black raspberry. R88 $16.79
http://www.northwest-wine.com/

Castlerock Zinfandel ’06 Mendocino – Turkey Red (Zinfandel)
As usual CR hits just outside the prime zone but close enough to be a winner. Big red fruit aromas with nice Zin style but not too big or tannic. You wished you’d get this as a “house wine” pour for $6 and may be best for that at your house. R89 $10.99
http://www.castlerockwinery.com

Chandon Blanc de Noir, NV Yountville – Turkey Red (Sparkling_)
This is my goes with everything Thanksgiving wine, nice salmon color with dark cherry, currant and strawberry fruit in the palate. There’s a bit of cassis and blackberry in the flavor and it finishes with a soft creamy texture. R89 $16.99
http://www.chandon.com

Chateau St. Jean “Robert Young Vineyard” Alexander Valley ‘06 Turkey White (Chardonnay)
A lovely chardonnay with floral, tangerine, nectarine and green pear aromas. It’s full-bodied with lots of lively flavors, a long, clean finish that picks up a nice vanilla and honeysuckle note. R92 $21.99
http://www.chateaustjean.com

Chateau Ste. Michelle “Eroica” Riesling ‘07 Turkey White (Riesling)
Slightly sweet but balanced by fine fruity acids, it smells of honeysuckle, white peaches and minerals. A top-notch Riesling with complexity that will age.” R93 $19.99.
http://www.ste-michelle.com

Chateau Ste. Michelle “Indian Wells” Columbia Valley ‘06 – Turkey White (Chardonnay)
This is a big wine with heady scents of caramelized apples and vanillin. The oak aromas on the palate, are brightened by juicy pear flavors and a nice balance of oak and fruit. R90 Best Buy $13.99
http://www.ste-michelle.com

Deloach Pinot Noir 2007, California Turkey Red (Pinot_Noir)
Not many PN’s out there in the reasonable price range these days that any good but this wine will get you started. It’s softly spiced with cherry flavors that are smooth and lengthy. It is clean, it is not hot, and it is not candied. Good value R87 $10.99
http://www.deloachvineyards.com/

Easton Zinfandel ‘07 Amador County – Turkey Red (Zinfandel)
Here is another house Zin done in a “claret-styled” Zinfandel. It’s loaded with pepper and spice and ripe, soft fruit flavors. Nice balance of fruit and alcohol in the finish. R89 $13.99
http://www.terrerougewines.com

Easton Zinfandel ‘07 Amador County – Turkey Red (Zinfandel)
Here is another house Zin done in a “claret-styled” Zinfandel. It’s loaded with pepper and spice and ripe, soft fruit flavors. Nice balance of fruit and alcohol in the finish. R89 $13.99
http://www.terrerougewines.com

Easton Zinfandel ‘07 Amador County – Turkey Red (Zinfandel)
Here is another house Zin done in a “claret-styled” Zinfandel. It’s loaded with pepper and spice and ripe, soft fruit flavors. Nice balance of fruit and alcohol in the finish. R89 $13.99
http://www.terrerougewines.com

Easton Zinfandel ‘07 Amador County – Turkey Red (Zinfandel)
Here is another house Zin done in a “claret-styled” Zinfandel. It’s loaded with pepper and spice and ripe, soft fruit flavors. Nice balance of fruit and alcohol in the finish. R89 $13.99
http://www.terrerougewines.com

Foxglove Central Coast Chardonnay ‘07 – Turkey White (Chardonnay)
A great value in the marketplace today, this is the second label of Varner winery that sources this fruit from the Edna Valley. The cuvee provides notes of tropical fruit and poached pear in a medium bodied style with minerality and precision. R90 $11.99
http://www.varnerwine.com/

Hayman & Hill Interchange ’06 Santa Barbara- Turkey White (Chardonnay)
A blend of 47% Chardonnay, 34% Sauvignon Blanc, 7% Muscat, 5% Malvasia Bianca, 4% Semillon and 3% Gewurztraminer that will more than cover the white side of turkey. It has just the right amount of aromatic grape varieties to go with the healthy doses of Chardonnay and Sauvignon Blanc. R88 $9.79
http://www.cdwine.com/ourwineries/haymanhill.htm

NV Domaine Chandon Blanc de Noirs – Turkey (Blanc_De_Noirs)
Blanc de Noirs¸ literally “white of blacks¸” is a sparkling wine made primarily from dark skinned grapes. The winemakers’ art is a balancing act of knowing just when to remove the grape skins after the grapes have been crushed to prevent the dark skin from transferring too much color to the wine. Chandon Blanc de Noirs is characteristically a delicate salmon color. Dark cherry¸ currant and strawberry dominate both aroma and flavor with hints of cassis and blackberry. These red fruit flavors build in the mid-palate and finish with a soft¸ lingering¸ creamy texture. It is a blend of Pinot Noir¸ Pinot Meunier and Chardonnay and spends a minimum of 12 months on the yeast. R 89 $15.99
http://www.chandon.com

NV Mumm Napa Blanc de Noirs – Turkey (Blanc_De_Noirs)
Blanc de Noirs¸ literally “white of blacks¸” is a sparkling wine made primarily from dark skinned grapes. The winemakers’ art is a balancing act of knowing just when to remove the grape skins after the grapes have been crushed to prevent the dark skin from transferring too much color to the wine. Mumm Napa Blanc de Noirs is also a pale salmon color and follows with a bouquet of ripe Pinot Noir fruit. Part of the wine is initially fermented in the press¸ producing a soft fruity character that gives Blanc de Noirs its directness¸ while a small percentage of Chardonnay gives the wine power and structure. Ripe Pinot Noir fruit gives the wine directness¸ while a hint of Chardonnay gives the wine its power and structure. R88 $15.99
http://www.mummnapa.com

Ridge “Three Valleys” Zinfandel ‘06 Sonoma County – Turkey Red (Zinfandel)
Ridge is a BIG zin producer but this wine within better reason and while it will age for a couple of years it tastes rather well now. Fresh black cherry flavors lead to a cool, forestry feel to balance the tannins and spice. R90 $19.99
http://www.ridgewine.com

Scharffenberger Brut NV Mendocino County – Turkey White (Sparkling_)
This Anderson Valley (Mendocino) bubbly is made from 65% Pinot Noir and 35% Chardonnay. The wine has complexity and richness. Good with most anything Thanksgiving. R89 $13.99
http://www.scharffenbergercellars.com/

Sebastiani Russian River Unoaked Chardonnay ‘07 Turkey White (Chardonnay)
This Chardonnay shows plenty of richness and creaminess from the particular yeast strain, I’m told, rather than oak aging. It has true Chardonnay flavor of citrus and apricot with the richness without the woodsy flavors. R90 $14.99
http://www.sebastiani.com/

Willow Crest Riesling ’07 Washington – Turkey White (Riesling)
A simple, dry Riesling with white flowers, pineapple and tangerine aromas in the nose. The dry fruit flavors cover the palate and it finishes up with a long-lasting lemony flavor. R88 $9.99

Two Complete Menus For Turkey With White And Red Wine